7 Memoirs By Writers That Became Blockbuster Movies

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Personal stories written by these seven women about real life also made blockbuster films in reel time.

“[Julie & Julia] does it right. A consummate entertainment that echoes the rhythms and attitudes of classic Hollywood, it’s a satisfying throwback to those old-fashioned movie fantasies where impossible dreams do come true. And, in this case, it really happened. Twice.”

Kenneth Turan, Film Critic, Los Angeles Times

“What’s best is the deceptive ease with which Walls makes us see just how she and her siblings were convinced that their turbulent life was a glorious adventure.”
— Francine Prose, Film Critic and novelist, in the New York Times Book Review

“[The film]peddles easy uplift instead of cold, hard truths. Hollywood has a knack for sanitizing books that deserve better.”
— Peter Travers, writing for Rolling Stone

“By far, this is the hardest movie I’ve ever made in my life. I didn’t hike a thousand miles, of course, but it was a different kind of physical rigor. I’d run up a hill with a 45-pound backpack on, and they’d say, ‘Wait, that backpack doesn’t look heavy enough. Put this 65-pound backpack on and run up the hill nine or ten times.” We literally didn’t stop shooting in those remote locations — we wouldn’t break for lunch, we’d just eat snacks. No bathroom breaks. It was crazy, but it was so wonderful. It was complete immersion, and I’ve never felt closer to a crew. We literally pulled each other up the mountains and carried each others’ equipment.”

— Reese Witherspoon, Producer & Actor, Wild

“A solid, duly moving account of their complicated relationship, spanning roughly 25 years, and made with impeccable professional polish.”
— Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter

“To read about her struggles with a 182-verse Sanskrit chant, or her (successful) attempt to meditate while being feasted on by mosquitoes, is to come about as close as you can to enlightenment-by-proxy.”
— Lev Grossman, Time

“Standing at the center of the story is Mariane Pearl, played by Angelina Jolie in a performance that is both physically and emotionally convincing. A few obvious makeup changes make her resemble the woman we saw so often on TV (curly hair, darker skin, the swelling belly), but Jolie’s performance depends above all on inner conviction.”
— Roger Ebert, American Film Critic, Chicago Sun Times

Marketing Executive combining Storytelling & Digitial Technology. Techstars Mentor. Former Bloomberg Journalist. Cambridge MBA. www.ShowMeMyCustomers.com

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